Promised Land

PRESENTED BY: Sno-King Meaningful Movies
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7:00 PM, Saturday, May 12, 2018
Location: Edmonds, WA (click for map)

“Promised Land” follows two tribes in the Pacific Northwest, the Duwamish and the Chinook, as they fight for the restoration of treaty rights they’ve long been denied. In following their story, the film examines a larger problem in the way that the government and society still looks at tribal sovereignty.

“Promised Land” debuted in select theaters in Fall 2016. It won the award for Achievement in Documentary Filmmaking at the 10th Annual LA Skins Fest, and was an official selection for the 41st Annual American Indian Film Festival, Northwest Film Forum’s 19th Annual Local Sightings Film Festival, the 12th Annual Ellensburg Film Festival, and the 5th Annual Social Justice Film Festival, among others.

“The film is about federal recognition, yes, but on a deeper level it’s about how to be an Indian in the modern world, how to fight even if you’re an elderly lady or a terminally ill man, how to take joy from the fight because of the friends you make, and most importantly, how to face death bravely and with honor, recognizing it as a transition and not an end. The U.S. will someday crumble into dust and be forgotten like all other empires. But cultures like the Chinook and the Duwamish will endure indefinitely, as long as there are those who love their ancestors and honor them with good work.”

– Indian Country Media Today Network

Indigenous recognition is at the frontline of the battle for native sovereignty. These tribes—who signed treaties, helped settlers, and lost their land—are asking for their treaties to be honored. To redefine their recognition, to put blood quantum restrictions on who is and isn’t native enough, to redefine treaties over and over, continues a toxic cycle of colonialism where the government, and the corporations it partners with, continues to unlawfully profit off of the resources of indigenous lands at great peril to our increasingly climate-challenged world.

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and refreshments are provided. After the movie, stay for a community discussion with members of the Duwamish and Chinook tribes. This event is free and open to the public.  Donations are gratefully accepted.

http://www.promisedlanddoc.com/

 

 

Special Guests: Edie Loyer Nelson, and Ken Workman, both of the Duwamish tribe

Sponsors:

  • Peace and Justice Committee, Edmonds Unitarian Universalist Congregation
  • Snohomish County Peace Action
  • Social Action Ministry, Shoreline Unitarian Universalist Church

Release Year: 2016

Running Time: 105 min.

Director: Vasant Samudre, Sarah Salcedo Samudre

RSVP Recommended

Online reservations are not required for this event.

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